New Biomaterial for Wounds: The No-Scar Approach to Healing Wounds

New Biomaterial for Wounds: The No-Scar Approach to Healing Wounds

There is no denying the fact that there are millions of advantages of biocompatibility and cell proliferative effects of synthetic and natural biomaterials for wounds. In this rapidly-changing world, medicine has been trying to come up with ways to speed up the healing process for various diseases, wounds, and procedures. The skin protects the body from external harm, detects environmental changes, and maintains physiological balance. Cutaneous healing and regeneration are significant medical problems in surgical wounds, acute traumas, and chronic disorders. Considering the complexities of the healing process, patients may experience therapeutic failure. Science has proven that biomaterial is extremely necessary for these new strategies.

Biomaterial is used for wound healing, with an emphasis on naturally produced categories, such as polysaccharide-based, protein-based, nano-fiber-based. There are also marine biomaterials that have been fully investigated in vivo and in clinical trials. 

There is a large range of biomaterials available, with their specific physicochemical properties, along with modern technology. This phenomenon is the key to meeting the challenge of customisation and healing wounds. Moreover, it helps in enabling personalised solutions for a wide range of conditions requiring tissue regeneration, such as wounds. 

Biomaterial for wounds healing can be classed in several ways based on their source, chemical composition, dressing type, or application. Both natural and synthetic biomaterials have been identified and used to treat wounds and post-operative incisions.

Most synthetic biomaterials have excellent physical properties but are difficult to produce. Natural biomaterials, on the other hand, do not induce cell toxicity or foreign body responses but have high natural variability.

Experts from McGill University have combined their knowledge of chemistry, physics, biology, and engineering to develop a new synthetic biomaterial that can mend the heart, muscles, and vocal cords. 

The synthetic hydrogel allows cells to move through to the wound site and accelerate healing, especially in tissues where movement is constant. Besides wound treatment, this new tech has the potential to open new avenues in tissue delivery and more. With room for further improvement, this signals a significant advancement in regenerative medicine.